WATCH: Aurora Borealis could shine this weekend in upper Midwest and Northeast

The northern lights are what we know as the Aurora Borealis when they come out of Canada and Alaska and can occasionally travel to other areas along the Arctic Circle. They are sometimes known…

WATCH: Aurora Borealis could shine this weekend in upper Midwest and Northeast

The northern lights are what we know as the Aurora Borealis when they come out of Canada and Alaska and can occasionally travel to other areas along the Arctic Circle. They are sometimes known as the Northern Lights or the Comet Aurora Borealis.

The northern lights are generated during storms; a storm of intense lighting in the northern latitudes is what is thought to produce them.

Tropical Storm Alberto hit Florida on Friday and could have crossed the country to Canada and Alaska by Saturday afternoon. But thunderstorms in the Great Lakes and the Midwest prevented the development of a tornado outbreak like a typical tornado that only spins up for a short time. Storms that are intense enough to produce a large-scale storm system can cause the Aurora Borealis to appear.

That was the case this weekend when a very large cold front invaded the Midwest and East Coast Friday and then changed direction. It then went through the Northeast on Saturday. That cold front collided with the Aurora Borealis and created widespread storms across the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes region, including Minnesota and Michigan.

The air was coming out of Canada, moving in from the Pacific. That ground being torn apart by storms is what leaves behind the Aurora Borealis, an undulating glowing light.

Looking to next week, cold fronts on Wednesday and Thursday will take a track parallel to the Arctic Circle, giving the Aurora Borealis an opportunity to shine this Sunday night.

Storms are more likely to develop along the northern boundary of Canada and the U.S. The more latitude away from the storm, the higher the chances of the Aurora Borealis to appear.

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