Doctor named in lawsuit called doctor who works under a pseudonym

TORONTO (AP) – An Ontario pathologist who was named this week in a lawsuit alleging his medical opinions are based on “irrational” and fear-mongering fears about immigrants and refugees continues to work at the…

Doctor named in lawsuit called doctor who works under a pseudonym

TORONTO (AP) – An Ontario pathologist who was named this week in a lawsuit alleging his medical opinions are based on “irrational” and fear-mongering fears about immigrants and refugees continues to work at the University of Toronto for as long as he wishes.

Dr. Dirk Huyer, a professor at the university’s medical school and a partner in the Toronto Institute for Human Genetics, is under fire for giving alternative cancer treatment to patients, on the theory they are infected with non-harmful viruses and thus cured.

Huyer’s chair in pathology said Thursday he didn’t know of a doctor in Canada having similar issues.

News of Huyer’s controversial work has rippled across the globe, with protests outside his Toronto clinic, questions from lawmakers in the U.S. and Europe and the immediate suspension of his immigration status.

The lawsuit said the work has meant Huyer stopped working at family physicians’ clinics and stopped seeing patients under pain medication, leading to a barrage of complaints and the review of more than 10,000 patients by his daughter, Dr. Jen Gunter.

“He doesn’t do it,” Dr. Peter Huber, Huyer’s chair in pathology, said Thursday. “He has never in my 25 years of working with him done any work in secret and never done any cancer diagnosis in secret.”

Huber called Huyer a world-class physician with a long record of volunteering and commitment to helping patients in need.

“He has certainly aspired to the highest standards and we are not accustomed to this. A friend of mine in a different profession once gave a lecture about how difficult it is to prove a negative and he said if we ever thought we had a unique science that we could prove, Dirk would be there,” Huber said.

While Huber is aware of the allegations, he did not investigate them himself. Huyer called the allegations “highly misleading.”

He has not returned a message seeking comment.

“On one hand, you want to defend your name, your reputation, and that there’s some absurdity that’s been put out,” he said. “That would be crazy and abusive and not my style.”

Huyer was named as a defendant in the court complaint by Aurora Theosophagus, a patient group on the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal. The case charges he should not have been appointed to the tribunal. The Toronto Star reports the complaint alleges the human rights tribunal has a conflict of interest in upholding an appointment based on a “flat-out falsehood” regarding widespread diagnoses of cancer by these patients.

The case was filed with the tribunal by Theosophagus and another organization that offers support to people who are burdened by misinformation and shoddy treatment in the health-care system.

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