All storms die, but not all storms race down the coast of the United States – in pictures

Hey, everybody! This one was going to go on for a few more days, right? OK, hurricane season’s officially over – at least officially. But just as we watched in disbelief as hurricanes Florence…

All storms die, but not all storms race down the coast of the United States – in pictures

Hey, everybody!

This one was going to go on for a few more days, right?

OK, hurricane season’s officially over – at least officially. But just as we watched in disbelief as hurricanes Florence and Michael headed out of the Atlantic, just as the storm surge started to recede and not unlike in the previous months when we braced for hurricanes and sat around in the waiting room listening to the leaders from the National Hurricane Center giving updates on the latest for the world, it turns out there were also storms that came from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf Coast.

So while we were looking at the hurricane that just did not die in October as a Category 4 storm, there was another one. One that used the more stable fuel of subtropical low pressure that brought it right over the USA. These happen to be the models of storm track and strength that forecasters use most of the time. Now! Hurricane Beryl, along with tropical storm Dennis and tropical storm Olivia are already inching closer to land and have strengthened to include them in our hurricane risk map.

Beryl will pass over that island of Curacao at some point on Thursday as a tropical storm and possibly regain hurricane status. Dennis will take a slightly different path, heading for Jamaica on Friday. Olivia is just over the coast of Nicaragua.

Not having the storms storm track their way across the top of the USA doesn’t mean we won’t see more hazards through hurricane season. But on the flip side of that, Hurricane Beryl may have more of an impact on the Caribbean. This is a storm we can’t yet predict, but if it passes close to the Lesser Antilles, that could affect our weather. Stay tuned!

This post has been updated to reflect new information about the size of Tropical Storm Olivia and Tropical Storm Dennis.

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